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Intro to Guitar enters “…totally uncharted territory.”

Listening #introguitar

Listening

Most of this entry was cross-posted on the Introduction to Guitar site here

I wanted to take a few minutes and tip my hat to the vibrant community that has sprung up around our school’s Introduction to Guitar class. Having had students post their work regularly to a wiki site in past years, I wanted to incorporate some of the design lessons I learned in #Philosophy12 and create a site that could function as a hub of creation, collaboration, and community that would serve not only our school’s face-to-face guitar students, but also offer wayfinding musicians on the open web a place to play, learn, and offer their own expertise to one another.

Alan Levine nailed it with this description:

it is not a class that teaches guitar but one where you can learn guitar.

And while I think the course has always functioned this way as a ‘closed’ system (even though we have shared our exploits on Youtube#ds106radio, and other places), the energy and inspiration that our open online participants have so far brought to the class has increased the creative combustibility of the group by several orders of magnitude. There are folks in JapanOntarioAustraliaSingapore, and even Ontario-azona strumming along with #IntroGuitar lessons and assignments, sharing stories of their instruments, their struggles (and triumphs) of playing music, and making meaningful musical connections with the face-to-face students who meet daily in our school’s choir room through videos, blog comments, and listening to performances in class.

One such connection that has been working its way through the course community began as a poem shared by a student of Jabiz Raisdana, in Singapore.

Having made some trans-oceanic songs written with Jabiz over the years, I opened up a Google Document and began sanding the poems edges and syllables with some chords and a basic melody. I recorded this so that folks could follow up with what I had made out of Michelle’s orginal poem, and posted the works on Twitter and the #IntroGuitar blog.

Over the weekend, Nathan John Moes continued to work with the chords and Michelle’s lyrics and added this version of the song that has been stuck in my head since Sunday night.

Take a listen. Seriously, wow.

Which all would have been amazing, right? A poem gets posted late at night (I might be adding that piece to the narrative…) on a student blog in Singapore, and a week later it’s spawned a song that has been amended, added to, and recorded by a few teachers in British Columbia.

But this ball is still rolling, still bouncing.

Coming full circle, Jabiz spent this past Saturday morning recording a new incarnation of the song (version III now, if you were counting), and so did Colin Jagoe, in Ontario.

Of his work putting the song and the recording together, Colin said:

...this is totally uncharted territory for me.

Totally uncharted territory, for a guy who isn’t even getting a grade or credit for the course and – beyond that – has been playing guitar for more than ten years.

And yet still, the ball bounces, and rolls. This morning Leslie joined the party all the way from Lima, Peru, offering the fifth (!) incarnation of the poem accompanied by her ukelele.

But this is likely not the end of this particular story, with chapters, verses and tomes yet to be discovered.

Update: Back in Singapore, Keri-Lee Beasley has added some stunning vocals to Nathan’s track. Check it out:

Maybe by you?

Click here to see about registering as a non-credit, open-online participant in Introduction to Guitar.

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Open Online Participation in Intro to Guitar

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This semester, you’ll be able to follow the goings on in one of our Introduction to Guitar courses, and even participate as an online, non-credit participant.

If you’re a guitar player who’s just starting out, or a seasoned six string slinger who is looking to document and share what they’ve come to know about their instrument and making music, we’d love to have just a bit of information to start out.

Interested non-credit online participants are welcome to register as authors on the blog by filling out the form below; from there you can comment on existing posts, or submit an artifact of your own learning (or instruction) as your own assignment. There are no minimums, and no apologies for open-online learners in Introduction to Guitar: do as much or as little as you like.

Mass Choir Rehearsal with Scott Leithead at Powell River Vocal Summit

Gleneagle’s Got Talent Teaser

Hallowe’en Jam with Mr. (Howlin’) Wolfson & Mr. Piratrovato

Gleneagle Music recognized on Baruch College Communications Institute blog

One of the listeners to Gleneagle’s Spring Concert, which aired live on #DS106Radio, was the director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Communication Institute & Writing Across the Curriculum coordinator at Baruch College, City University of NY, Mikhail Gershovich (Full disclosure: Mikhail provided part of the motivation to have the packed-house shout, DS106 Radio for Life!).

In his recent post on his college’s blog, Mikhail documents the broadcast of the concert as a landmark in the school’s history:

On June 9, 2011, students in the music program at Gleneagle Secondary School, a high school in Vancouver suburb Coquitam, BC, played their spring concert to a packed house in a 450 seat auditorium. A first in Gleneagle history, the performance was broadcast live over Internet radio to listeners all over the world. And while  that might sound like a huge undertaking requiring serious AV and IT infrastructure, it was not. Not at all. In a brilliant feat of do-it-yourself EdTech (or what some folks might have once called edupunk), the concert was streamed live by Bryan Jackson, a Music and English teacher in the school’s TALONS program, and graduating senior Olga Belikov, with a Macbook, some free software and a USB microphone. That’s it. That’s all it took to broadcast the spring concert to anyone anywhere who wanted to hear it. And it sounded great.

TED Talk: Charles Hazlewood and “Trusting the Ensemble”