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Listen to the Christmas Concert on Live Web Radio

You can tune in to tonight’s Gleneagle Music Christmas concert on 105 the Hive, a distributed K-12 web radio station developed and maintained by Ontario teachers Andy Forgrave and Heather Durnin, along with Clarence Fisher and a few other teachers across Canada. Inspired and brought about by the same technology (and some of the same people) that first broadcast Gleneagle events on #ds106radio, we’re excited at the prospect of sharing the warmth of the MPR tonight with a new audience.

Tune in by opening this playlist in an Internet browser or with a media player (like iTunes or VLC): http://radio.shoutcastcloud.com/tunein.php/hedurnin/playlist.pls 

You can read about the last few years’ experiments in K12 Web Radio at Gleneagle here.

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Spring Concert to be Broadcast on Internet Radio

In continuing to break out of the box of physical limitations around the performing arts (many of them only happen once: if you miss it, you miss it), and find new ways to preserve and otherwise share our department’s myriad wonderful concerts, improvisations, and tour stops, Gleneagle Music’s Spring Concert (June 9th – 7pm PST) will be broadcast live on the distributed station, DS106 Radio. Originally conceived as an outlet for creative work in Jim Groom‘s raucous Digital Storytelling 106 course, offered through the University of Mary Washington, DS106 Radio is:

…a free form live streaming station that has been setup for this course, and it is being used as a platform to broadcast the work being created in the class, and a space for live broadcasts as well as for programming shows. The whole point of this experiment is to encourage any and all members of the course (as well as beyond it) to produce something real for anyone who wants to tune in. It’s also provides a global, 24 hour/7 day-a-week happening for the creations of the course and much, much more. And more than anything, ds106 radio is place where anyone can submit their work and help program the course radio station in order to commune and share around works and ideas while at the same time making the web safe for democracy.

Gleneagle Music students have been sharing rehearsals and lunchtime jam sessions live to DS106Radio audiences for the last few weeks, offering listeners ‘teasers‘ of material they will be treated to on June 9th, at approximately 7pm (Pacific Time Zone). Check in with @GleneagleMusic or @BryanJack on Twitter for updates prior-to the show.

You can stream the station live into iTunes and other media players by clicking the link below:

Listen to DS106 Radio

#Cuba2015 Tour Updates and Airport Broadcast

Greetings!

While our Internet access over the next week in Cuba will be spotty (at best), we are looking to be able to provide updates from this year’s tour via the school’s Twitter account (@gleneaglemusic), and in the weeks following the trip here on the music blog. To whet your appetite, you can enjoy some of the exploits from our previous Cuba visit in 2011 here, along with the above video compilation of our visit to the Matanzas Fine Arts Elementary School.

Here are a few of our choir students sight-singing along with choral students at the Matanzas Fine Arts High School we visited, as well.

And an impromptu performance by Steven and Kate with several Cuban dance students looking on.

A favourite from the 2011 tour, here are Jessica and Scott wowing our hotel lobby with a rendition of “the Prayer” on a very honky-tonking piano.

And Kyle practicing a little conversational percussion with a jazz student at the fine arts high school.

Along with these sorts of gems, this year we will again be broadcasting from our departure gate before heading south to the Carribean, live on DS106 Radio. You can tune in to this broadcast, beginning somewhere before our 8am boarding, by accessing the media player here: ds106rad.io/listen Staying tuned to the Music Department Twitter account will also keep you in the loop for this broadcast and other updates throughout the trip.

Wishing our traveling students a good night’s rest before our trip tomorrow, and our parent community many hearty thanks for their support to make this trip possible!

 

 

 

Lunchtime Jams: Resurrected!

Lunchtime Jam w/ Jacquie, Donya & Olga 06.07.11

2010 Lunchtime Jam

Over the last few years, Gleneagle Music has made a habit of sharing live performances with the Ontario-based K12 web radio station, 105 the Hive. Our  Introduction to Guitar class has presented recitals on the air, we stream almost all of our concerts each year, and our ensembles and choirs shared tour stops in California live to listeners in Canada, Europe, New Zealand, and South America. By special request from a Gleneagle parent on vacation in Ireland last spring, we shared the entirety of the Voices Benefit Concert so he could hear his son play drums on a cover of Elvis Presley’s “Hound Dog.”

This Fall, a group of graduating seniors have been plotting a return of one of the early traditions of web radio in the choir and band rooms: the Lunchtime Jam.

Beginning this Thursday (October 3rd) on lunch hour, you’ll be able to stream live music directly from Gleneagle Music on 105 the Hive. Stay tuned, or say Hi! to our @GleneagleMusic Twitter feed, and join us via any of the means listed here to enjoy:

Listen to 105 the Hive

Screen shot 2013-10-02 at 9.32.16 PM

Kicking things off on Thursday are members of Gleneagle’s Alluvium, who may be joined by the guys from Knit Me a House.

Here’s Alluvium at last year’s Voices concert:

Postcards from California

Over spring break, the Gleneagle Music Department will be headed south to Los Angeles and the Heritage Music Festival, where we brought home many awards and recognitions four years ago (when the festival was held in New York City).

Students in Gleneagle’s bands, choir, and vocal jazz ensembles will be taking in not only the elite musical showcase at the festival, but also the wilds of Disneyland, Universal Studios, and the California Beach (not to mention temperatures approaching 30 Celsius ), and will be bringing home no shortage of laughter and memorable experiences to be shared in car rides home from YVR and into the rest of the spring semester.

But we hope to be sharing some of our adventures and performances with our audience here on the Music at Gleneagle blog, as well as Twitter, Youtube, Flickr, and K12 distributed web radio station 105 the Hive, based in Ontario, Canada.

You can subscribe to this site by entering your email address above to recieve updates when we post things here, or can also check back on a regular basis.

The Music Department will also be updating its Twitter profile with more sporadic 140 character posts and pictures, which you can view and follow here, www.twitter.com/gleneaglemusic. Recordings and videos will be shared here on the blog, but we will also be streaming recordings and audio post cards live from the festival and hotel on 105 the Hive Radio for Learning, which you can listen to by visiting their website: http://www.105thehive.org/listen.

Stay tuned to the Gleneagle Twitter account to hear about upcoming live broadcasts.

Some memorable tour moments shared on the blog in the last few years:

Powell River Vocal Summit Tour Video (2011)

Mass Choir Rehearsal with Scott Leithead at the Powell River Vocal Summit (2012)

Visiting the Fine Arts Elementary School in Matanzas, Cuba (2011)

Choir singing in the Cathedral of Havana (2011)

Sight-Sining w/ Fine Arts students in Matanzas, Cuba (2011)

Jessica & Scott wowing the lobby audience at our hotel in Cuba (2011)

We hope to be sharing more and adding to this list in just over a week, and hope you can join us!

Contact Mr. Bryan Jackson (brjackson at sd43.bc.ca / http://www.twitter.com/bryanjack) if you have any questions or trouble connecting to any of the above. 

Intro to Guitar enters “…totally uncharted territory.”

Listening #introguitar

Listening

Most of this entry was cross-posted on the Introduction to Guitar site here

I wanted to take a few minutes and tip my hat to the vibrant community that has sprung up around our school’s Introduction to Guitar class. Having had students post their work regularly to a wiki site in past years, I wanted to incorporate some of the design lessons I learned in #Philosophy12 and create a site that could function as a hub of creation, collaboration, and community that would serve not only our school’s face-to-face guitar students, but also offer wayfinding musicians on the open web a place to play, learn, and offer their own expertise to one another.

Alan Levine nailed it with this description:

it is not a class that teaches guitar but one where you can learn guitar.

And while I think the course has always functioned this way as a ‘closed’ system (even though we have shared our exploits on Youtube#ds106radio, and other places), the energy and inspiration that our open online participants have so far brought to the class has increased the creative combustibility of the group by several orders of magnitude. There are folks in JapanOntarioAustraliaSingapore, and even Ontario-azona strumming along with #IntroGuitar lessons and assignments, sharing stories of their instruments, their struggles (and triumphs) of playing music, and making meaningful musical connections with the face-to-face students who meet daily in our school’s choir room through videos, blog comments, and listening to performances in class.

One such connection that has been working its way through the course community began as a poem shared by a student of Jabiz Raisdana, in Singapore.

Having made some trans-oceanic songs written with Jabiz over the years, I opened up a Google Document and began sanding the poems edges and syllables with some chords and a basic melody. I recorded this so that folks could follow up with what I had made out of Michelle’s orginal poem, and posted the works on Twitter and the #IntroGuitar blog.

Over the weekend, Nathan John Moes continued to work with the chords and Michelle’s lyrics and added this version of the song that has been stuck in my head since Sunday night.

Take a listen. Seriously, wow.

Which all would have been amazing, right? A poem gets posted late at night (I might be adding that piece to the narrative…) on a student blog in Singapore, and a week later it’s spawned a song that has been amended, added to, and recorded by a few teachers in British Columbia.

But this ball is still rolling, still bouncing.

Coming full circle, Jabiz spent this past Saturday morning recording a new incarnation of the song (version III now, if you were counting), and so did Colin Jagoe, in Ontario.

Of his work putting the song and the recording together, Colin said:

...this is totally uncharted territory for me.

Totally uncharted territory, for a guy who isn’t even getting a grade or credit for the course and – beyond that – has been playing guitar for more than ten years.

And yet still, the ball bounces, and rolls. This morning Leslie joined the party all the way from Lima, Peru, offering the fifth (!) incarnation of the poem accompanied by her ukelele.

But this is likely not the end of this particular story, with chapters, verses and tomes yet to be discovered.

Update: Back in Singapore, Keri-Lee Beasley has added some stunning vocals to Nathan’s track. Check it out:

Maybe by you?

Click here to see about registering as a non-credit, open-online participant in Introduction to Guitar.

Gleneagle Music recognized on Baruch College Communications Institute blog

One of the listeners to Gleneagle’s Spring Concert, which aired live on #DS106Radio, was the director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Communication Institute & Writing Across the Curriculum coordinator at Baruch College, City University of NY, Mikhail Gershovich (Full disclosure: Mikhail provided part of the motivation to have the packed-house shout, DS106 Radio for Life!).

In his recent post on his college’s blog, Mikhail documents the broadcast of the concert as a landmark in the school’s history:

On June 9, 2011, students in the music program at Gleneagle Secondary School, a high school in Vancouver suburb Coquitam, BC, played their spring concert to a packed house in a 450 seat auditorium. A first in Gleneagle history, the performance was broadcast live over Internet radio to listeners all over the world. And while  that might sound like a huge undertaking requiring serious AV and IT infrastructure, it was not. Not at all. In a brilliant feat of do-it-yourself EdTech (or what some folks might have once called edupunk), the concert was streamed live by Bryan Jackson, a Music and English teacher in the school’s TALONS program, and graduating senior Olga Belikov, with a Macbook, some free software and a USB microphone. That’s it. That’s all it took to broadcast the spring concert to anyone anywhere who wanted to hear it. And it sounded great.

The Spring Concert, live on Twitter









Spring Concert @ Gleneagle Secondary this Thursday Night

Of course, if you can’t attend in person, you can stream the event live on internet radio!

Guitar class covers Hendrix, looks to crowd-source requests

This morning’s block one rehearsal of this week’s song, “All Along the Watchtower,” written by Bob Dylan and popularized by Jimi Hendrix. (You can view 12″ of block two’s rehearsal yesterday by clicking here.)

Through playing and discussion, the class has learned the blues scale as it applies to playing lead guitar, as well as delved into one of the masterpieces of the classic rock era, both in its place in the technical evolution of guitar playing, as well as cultural significance in songwriting and simplicity. As Bob Dylan includes in live versions of the song, “All Along the Watchtower” is the story of just “this red guitar, three chords and the truth.”

The class has made use of some familiar guests on drums this week, and included contributions of electric guitar, various percussion instruments (including a tambourine played by foot, and an egg-shaker trio), piano, and more than twenty acoustic guitars in this morning’s rendition that saw us through the bell.

Students have been asked to submit similar songs for next week’s fodder: simply constructed songs – two or three or four-chord numbers – that have helped mold modern popular music. In getting to know the collectively agreed upon thread of the history of an instrument that has shaped music and culture irrevocably in the last fifty years, the class – and its fortunate teacher – are hoping to enlist your help.

If you are a music lover, a musician, musical historian, journalist, or another self-titled expert in the study of popular music, or even if you merely enjoy music, whatever it is you hear on the radio, we believe that no matter who you are, music is an important part of peoples’ lives, and would like to know what you think we should be playing next.

There are six weeks left of school: enough time to reasonably learn five or six essential, vital, simple songs that each of our young guitar players should have the opportunity to explore in the small tribes of our beginner classes.

We would appreciate any help you could give us, either by leaving a comment on this post, connecting with us on Twitter (@GleneagleMusic), or emailing guitar instructor Bryan Jackson (brjackson at sd43 dot bc dot ca) with any suggestions or references you could offer in this pursuit.